Sunday, February 21, 2010

together

The Lenten season always seems full of invitations to join other people on their wanderings in the wilderness, and I usually eagerly and delightfully accept. Wandering is, by nature, a lonely process, so I'm glad to have companions along the way. Penny, a friend from seminary, is praying and reflecting on her blog, and a recent post made a little bit of sense out of my own compulsion to wander so LITERALLY this year:

Like most spiritual things, spiritual growth is best done in community. We wrestle with others, not to sharpen our blades against one another, but to engage spiritual questions and allow ourselves to be transformed in community.

Last night, J and I sat at the bar at Ajax for a couple of hours and, like the incredibly good theology nerds that we are, discussed the nature of spiritual experience. We made fun of the English grad students sitting next to us for their pompous diatribes on Shakespeare, immediately returning to our own pompous explanations of the individuality of an experience of God.

For all our pomposity and arrogance, though, discussions like that with J are one of the most clarifying ways of understanding what's happening in the world for me. We agree enough to understand the subject matter, and we disagree enough to refine one another's opinions.

Penny's post and that conversation put my lenten travels into perspective. In the next 6 weeks, I'll get to see and sit and talk with almost all of my closest friends. Almost. And I might have to extend my travels past Easter - to get to Northern Virginia and France. But something is happening ("I do not want to make more of this than what it is," I wrote the other day, "but it is. It is.") and I want to be with the people who have become, over these last few years, my community.

3 comments:

Penelopepiscopal said...

:-)

Anonymous said...

B,
It sounds like something very profound is going on inside you. I pray that God will make things clear to you as you go. Thanks for blogging. I love reading your thoughts.
I'm reading The Omnivore's Dilema,
Trisha

bekah said...

wish Richmond was in your travel schedule. It's almost impossible to get through Lent without you, Dana - not after mucking through it with you twice.